Liberty is an inherently offensive lifestyle. Living in a free society guarantees that each one of us will see our most cherished principles and beliefs questioned and in some cases mocked. That psychic discomfort is the price we pay for basic civic peace. It's worth it. It's a pragmatic principle. Defend everyone else's rights, because if you don't there is no one to defend yours. -- MaxedOutMama

I don't just want gun rights... I want individual liberty, a culture of self-reliance....I want the whole bloody thing. -- Kim du Toit

The most glaring example of the cognitive dissonance on the left is the concept that human beings are inherently good, yet at the same time cannot be trusted with any kind of weapon, unless the magic fairy dust of government authority gets sprinkled upon them.-- Moshe Ben-David

The cult of the left believes that it is engaged in a great apocalyptic battle with corporations and industrialists for the ownership of the unthinking masses. Its acolytes see themselves as the individuals who have been "liberated" to think for themselves. They make choices. You however are just a member of the unthinking masses. You are not really a person, but only respond to the agendas of your corporate overlords. If you eat too much, it's because corporations make you eat. If you kill, it's because corporations encourage you to buy guns. You are not an individual. You are a social problem. -- Sultan Knish

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Quote of the Day - Democratic Operatives with Bylines Edition

Seen at Glenn's, courtesy of Ed Driscoll:
Modern journalism is all about deciding which facts the public shouldn’t know because they might reflect badly on Democrats. - Jim Treacher
Yup.

The internet has gone a long way towards beating down the walls the gatekeepers seek to control, but it hasn't succeeded yet in penetrating John and Jane Doe's living rooms.  Far too many people still get all their "news" from ABCNNBCBS and the major newspapers.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

My Pusher Dealer Emailed Me Last Night...

(Merchant O'Death:) Are you still interested in a Marlin lever gun?

(Me:) Yeah, but I want this one:

Marlin 1895GBL

Found it online for $625 plus freight, but I've got some expenses to cover this month.  Probably won't be able to afford it for another couple of months.

(MO'D:)  We have a bead blasted stainless version of that gun (or one very similar to it) that came in used today. Gray laminated stock. Rear peep sight.

(Me:) What kind of price?  This one?

(MO'D:) Pretty much the same gun but the guy had it bead blasted resulting in a matte finish. I will have a look at the price tomorrow when I get to work.

(Me:) The big thing is the large-loop lever and the six-round magazine tube. With this one, I'd kinda like it black, but I can always get it cerakoted. But the stainless rifles are a lot pricier than the chromoly steel ones. Even used, I'd expect the stainless version to run close to $800. That's a bit more than I'm willing to spend.

But let me know.

(MO'D:) I'll text you with the details.

(Me:) You are an evil, evil man.

(MO'D:) Yes. Yes I am.
He texted me this morning. It wasn't $800.

I traded a pistol to get it.  I can pick it up August 13.  I'll be bringing it to the Rendezvous.

1895 photo 1895SBL.jpg

Friday, July 24, 2015

Planned Obsolescence

I have a 16GB iPod my wife gave me several years ago.  It runs iOS 4.2.1, and is no longer supported by Apple, though it works just fine.  It's so old there is no Kindle app for it.

My version of iTunes is 12.1.2.27, apparently the last that will operate on Windows XP, which my home desktop is still running.

Fifty percent of the music I have on iTunes refuses to copy onto my iPod.  It says the music is there, but it won't play.

Fuck you, Steve Jobs.

Quote of the Day - RACIST! Edition

Seen on Facebook:
White privilege = being held responsible for the acts of your ancestors by blacks who accept no responsibility for the acts of their children.  Mark L. Anderson

Thursday, July 23, 2015

I Love Arizona

Rated #1 for the third year in a row:
1. Arizona
arizona
Still the reigning champion, Arizona combines strong laws with an unmatched shooting culture and strong industry presence. An effort to strengthen the state's preemption law failed to make it out of the legislature this year, but a clarifying bill did pass, specifying that the transfer of firearms was immune from administrative or municipal regulation. Arizona gets full points in every category with both permitless and permitted carry, strong self-defense laws, a "shall sign" NFA statue and a thriving competitive shooting scene. Whether you're into ISPC-style shooting, 3-Gun, long-range rifles, Cowboy matches, shotgunning or just shooting machine guns in the desert, Arizona has everyone covered.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

30 Days Until the Rendezvous

The Tenth Annual Gun Blogger Rendezvous, that is.  Here's some videos from previous iterations of the event:

GBR IX:


GBR VI:







GBR V:

GBR IV:

Oddly, there's not a lot of footage of us eating, drinking and talking back at the hotel!

But here's some of the stuff that you could take home from the Rendezvous last year:


You've still got time to register and make your reservations! Get a move on!

Monday, July 20, 2015

REPOST: One Small Step for Man

I posted this a couple of years ago. Here it is updated.


On this day at 02:56 UTC 46 years ago, Neil Armstrong became the first human being to leave one of these on the surface of another astronomical body. Three years and five months later, Eugene Cernan became the last man to do so, so far.

The last Space Shuttle touched down for the last time on this day four year ago.

Elon Musk of PayPal, Tesla and SpaceX fame has said that the impetus behind the development of SpaceX came when his son asked him, "is it really true that they used to fly to the moon when you were a boy?"

Now there are two-dozen or more private space ventures around the world. There is a plan to capture and retrieve an asteroid for commercial purposes. Two companies want to mine the moon.

If we can just hold it together for a couple more decades, humanity might get off this rock, and we might do it in my lifetime.

But it's not looking too good.

Not good at all.

Saturday, July 18, 2015

A Reaction to Sudden Jihad Syndrome?

Interesting observation at the grocery store today. I do the majority of my shopping at Frys, near my home, or at the WalMart Supercenter a bit farther away. It is not remarkably unusual to see someone open-carrying in WalMart (usually in a nylon Uncle Mike's holster - make of that what you will), but I can't recall seeing anyone open carry at Frys.

Today there were three.

Monday, July 13, 2015

Quote of the Day - (Lack of) Education Edition

From an interview with David Gelernter via a link from Clayton Cramer's blog
GELERNTER: I’m a teacher of college students. I’m lucky to be at one of the best colleges in the world, at Yale. Our students are as smart as any in the world. They work very hard to get here. They are eager, they’re likable. My generation is getting a chip on its shoulder, we always thought we knew everything about every topic, our professors were morons, and we were the ones who were building the world.

My students today are much less obnoxious. Much more likable than I and my friends used to be, but they are so ignorant that it’s hard to accept how ignorant they are. You tell yourself stories; it’s very hard to grasp that the person you’re talking to, who is bright, articulate, advisable, interested, and doesn’t know who Beethoven is. Had no view looking back at the history of the 20th century – just sees a fog. A blank. Has the vaguest idea of who Winston Churchill was or why he mattered. And maybe has no image of Teddy Roosevelt, let’s say, at all. I mean, these are people who – We have failed.

--

(H)ow did we get to this point today when my students know nothing?

They know nothing about art. They know nothing about history. They know nothing about philosophy. And because they have been raised as not even atheists, they don’t rise to the level of atheists, insofar as they’ve never thought about the existence or nonexistence of God. It has never occurred to them. They know nothing about the Bible. They’ve never opened it. They’ve been taught it’s some sort of weird toxic thing, especially the Hebrew Bible, full of all sorts of terrible, murderous, prejudiced, bigoted. They’ve never read it. They have no concept.

It used to be, if I turned back to the 1960s to my childhood, that at least people have heard of Isaiah. People had heard of the Psalms. They had some notion of Hebrew poetry, having created the poetry of the Western world. They had some notion of the great prophets having created our notions of justice and honesty and fairness in society

But these children not only ignorant of everything in the intellectual realm, they have been raised ignorant in the spiritual world. They don’t go to church. They don’t go to synagogue. They have no contact – the Americans. Some of the Asians are different. Some of the Asians – and, of course, the Asians play a larger and larger role. But I think, from what I can tell, the Asians are moving in an American direction, and they’re pulling up their own religious roots.

But when I see a bright, young Yale student who has been reared not as Jew, not as a Christian, outside of any religious tradition, why should he tell the truth? Why should he not lie? Why should he be fair and straightforward in his dealings with his fellow students? He has sort of an idea that’s the way he should be, but why? If you challenge him, he doesn’t know. And he’ll say, “Well, it’s just my view.” And I mean, after all everybody has his own view.

KRISTOL: So we began in the 50s, and now we’re 60 years later. How did this, what were the big break points in your judgment from “Serious America” to America-Lite?

GELERNTER: It seems to me something happened. There was a historical event, which needs to be understood and recognized more clearly than it is. The cultural revolution in the United States, which people take for granted. If I tell people there was a cultural revolution, yeah sure, there were a lot of changes in the 60s. But it’s more than that. It’s a double change.

Colleges and universities. Let’s look at the generation after the Second World War. This is a cultural revolution, it seems to me to extend roughly from 1945 to 1970. So in 1970 everything is different. Things are radically different. And what happened during those 25 years? Colleges and universities became vastly, vastly more influential on American culture.
Remember the words of John Taylor Gatto:
In the first decades of the twentieth century, a small group of soon-to-be-famous academics, symbolically led by John Dewey and Edward Thorndike of Columbia Teachers College, Ellwood P. Cubberley of Stanford, G. Stanley Hall of Clark, and an ambitious handful of others, energized and financed by major corporate and financial allies like Morgan, Astor, Whitney, Carnegie, and Rockefeller, decided to bend government schooling to the service of business and the political state—as it had been done a century before in Prussia.

Cubberley delicately voiced what was happening this way: "The nature of the national need must determine the character of the education provided." National need, of course, depends upon point of view. The NEA in 1930 sharpened our understanding by specifying in a resolution of its Department of Superintendence that what school served was an "effective use of capital" through which our "unprecedented wealth-producing power has been gained." When you look beyond the rhetoric of Left and Right, pronouncements like this mark the degree to which the organs of schooling had been transplanted into the corporate body of the new economy.

It’s important to keep in mind that no harm was meant by any designers or managers of this great project. It was only the law of nature as they perceived it, working progressively as capitalism itself did for the ultimate good of all. The real force behind school effort came from true believers of many persuasions, linked together mainly by their belief that family and church were retrograde institutions standing in the way of progress. Far beyond the myriad practical details and economic considerations there existed a kind of grail-quest, an idea capable of catching the imagination of dreamers and firing the blood of zealots.
and
At the start of WWII millions of men showed up at registration offices to take low-level academic tests before being inducted. The years of maximum mobilization were 1942 to1944; the fighting force had been mostly schooled in the 1930s, both those inducted and those turned away. Of the 18 million men were tested, 17,280,000 of them were judged to have the minimum competence in reading required to be a soldier, a 96 percent literacy rate. Although this was a 2 percent fall-off from the 98 percent rate among voluntary military applicants ten years earlier, the dip was so small it didn’t worry anybody.

WWII was over in 1945. Six years later another war began in Korea. Several million men were tested for military service but this time 600,000 were rejected. Literacy in the draft pool had dropped to 81 percent, even though all that was needed to classify a soldier as literate was fourth- grade reading proficiency. In the few short years from the beginning of WWII to Korea, a terrifying problem of adult illiteracy had appeared. The Korean War group received most of its schooling in the 1940s, and it had more years in school with more professionally trained personnel and more scientifically selected textbooks than the WWII men, yet it could not read, write, count, speak, or think as well as the earlier, less-schooled contingent.

A third American war began in the mid-1960s. By its end in 1973 the number of men found noninductible by reason of inability to read safety instructions, interpret road signs, decipher orders, and so on—in other words, the number found illiterate—had reached 27 percent of the total pool. Vietnam-era young men had been schooled in the 1950s and the 1960s—much better schooled than either of the two earlier groups—but the 4 percent illiteracy of 1941 which had transmuted into the 19 percent illiteracy of 1952 had now had grown into the 27 percent illiteracy of 1970. Not only had the fraction of competent readers dropped to 73 percent but a substantial chunk of even those were only barely adequate; they could not keep abreast of developments by reading a newspaper, they could not read for pleasure, they could not sustain a thought or an argument, they could not write well enough to manage their own affairs without assistance.

Consider how much more compelling this steady progression of intellectual blindness is when we track it through army admissions tests rather than college admissions scores and standardized reading tests, which inflate apparent proficiency by frequently changing the way the tests are scored.
--

Back in 1952 the Army quietly began hiring hundreds of psychologists to find out how 600,000 high school graduates had successfully faked illiteracy. Regna Wood sums up the episode this way:
After the psychologists told the officers that the graduates weren’t faking, Defense Department administrators knew that something terrible had happened in grade school reading instruction. And they knew it had started in the thirties. Why they remained silent, no one knows. The switch back to reading instruction that worked for everyone should have been made then. But it wasn’t.
In 1882, fifth graders read these authors in their Appleton School Reader: William Shakespeare, Henry Thoreau, George Washington, Sir Walter Scott, Mark Twain, Benjamin Franklin, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Bunyan, Daniel Webster, Samuel Johnson, Lewis Carroll, Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others like them. In 1995, a student teacher of fifth graders in Minneapolis wrote to the local newspaper, "I was told children are not to be expected to spell the following words correctly: back, big, call, came, can, day, did, dog, down, get, good, have, he, home, if, in, is, it, like, little, man, morning, mother, my, night, off, out, over, people, play, ran, said, saw, she, some, soon, their, them, there, time, two, too, up, us, very, water, we, went, where, when, will, would, etc. Is this nuts?"
and
Exactly what John Dewey heralded at the onset of the twentieth century has indeed happened. Our once highly individualized nation has evolved into a centrally managed village, an agora made up of huge special interests which regard individual voices as irrelevant. The masquerade is managed by having collective agencies speak through particular human beings. Dewey said this would mark a great advance in human affairs, but the net effect is to reduce men and women to the status of functions in whatever subsystem they are placed. Public opinion is turned on and off in laboratory fashion. All this in the name of social efficiency, one of the two main goals of forced schooling.
In related news:
The top student in a high school’s graduating class used to earn the honor of being the valedictorian, and traditionally that one student delivered a commencement speech that helped send his or her classmates out into the adult world.

But at Arlington's Washington-Lee High School this year, there were 117 valedictorians out of a class of 457. At Long Beach Polytechnic in California, there were 30. And at some schools — including North Hills High outside of Pittsburgh and high schools in Miami — there were none.

--

"Education's not a game. It's not about 'I finished first and you finished second,'" said North Hills Superintendent Patrick J. Mannarino, who was the North Hills High principal when the school got rid of the valedictorian designation in 2009. "That high school diploma declares you all winners."
Apparently not.

RTWT.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Gun Blogger Rendezvous Update

So, if you're coming to the Rendezvous, and you own anything chambered in .45-70, you might want to bring it.  Special Interest Arms is bringing their Gardner Gun and some other interesting stuff as well:
Not planning to run it (the Gardner Gun) for hours at a time, just burst, so no need to deal with water for it.

Going to need help getting it into the hotel after the range for the show and tell too.
Some one needs to follow with a camera, the looks on tourist faces as we wheel a Gardner Gun along the casino floor should be priceless!

I'm also planning to bring the 300 BLK Trecenti again and the new 9mm Novem bolt action. If you want to find out just how good your 9mm suppressor is bring it and the ability to put it on 1/2-28 threads. Eliminating the action noise really lets the suppressor work.

Probably bring the AK-47 FA and suppressed FA 9mm AR-15 too. Might even drag out my old .303B deer rifle for the long range targets.

I will try to get Brian to come out again and bring his De Lisle and other suppressors to demonstrate too. He's been in the NFA game for decades and has a lot of interesting stories if you can get him to take time for a real interview. Hint, ask him about how you get a demo letter for a post-sample Mini-Gun.
And Anthony Welsch of LuckyGunner.com is bringing 1,500 rounds of cowboy .45-70 ammo:
I heard back from our purchasing folks today. It sounds like getting some 45-70 in bulk quantities shouldn’t be a problem so I’ll plan to ship 1,500 rounds or so west with the rest of the ammunition orders.

I’ll talk with hotel management and ask if they have any special requests for getting the Gardner inside. If some open carried AR’s at a Chipotle can create national news I can’t imagine what a Gardner on a casino floor would do!
Me either!

I doubt Richard will want to run 1,500 rounds through his $24,500 floor sample.  I doubt Anthony wants to ship any ammo HOME, so bring your Trapdoor Springfields, Marlin 1895's and other guns!

Friday, July 10, 2015

Quote of the Day - Lynn Russell Edition

Here's the truth:

1. Criminals will always have guns, this is not about them.

2. Americans have a constitutional right to bear arms. Humans have a right to defend themselves. If we didn't have the Second Amendment, we would create it.

3. You can't control everything; but if it makes you feel better, go with a simple law preventing violent offenders from buying firearms. Make it "violent" offenders rather than "white collar" offenders, or most of Capitol Hill won't be allowed to own them.

4. Get a gun, get legal, be responsible, trust yourself. Don't trust yourself? Then don't carry. But for God's sake then, shut the f**k up about it, because that's where your involvement ends.

Chuck and I were married one year ago, on the Fourth of July. Sure, we celebrated our first wedding anniversary in a hospital. But thanks to the Second Amendment, my crack-shot husband and the pistol he used, we were able to have a first anniversary.
 photo Rachel_Madcow.jpg

Tuesday, July 07, 2015

Ru-roh, Shaggy, How They Gonna Spin THIS One?

The L.A. Dog Trainer Times reports: Gun in fatal San Francisco shooting belonged to federal agent.
The gun used to fatally shoot a woman on the San Francisco Embarcadero belonged to a federal agent, sources confirmed Tuesday.
--

No additional details about the gun were available Tuesday. The district attorney’s office declined to comment.
Yes, I imagine they did decline to comment. At least until the DA's office is told what to say about it, if anything.

So! This gun presumably belonged to not just a local or state "Only One," but a FED who had "proper training," and it was even registered! And somehow, a multiple deportee illegal alien got his hands on it anyway.  And this took place in the gun-control utopia and sanctuary city of San Francisco! A lot of good that did Kathryn Steinle.

I am very sorry for her family.

Quote of the Day - Totalitarian Edition

The first part comes from this Federalist essay, The New Totalitarians are Here.  Strongly recommended.
Simply put, authoritarians merely want obedience, while totalitarians, whose rule is rooted in an ideology, want obedience and conversion.

--

Totalitarians are a different breed. These are the people who have a plan, who think they see the future more clearly than you or who are convinced they grasp reality in a way that you do not. They don’t serve themselves—or, they don’t serve themselves exclusively—they serve History, or The People, or The Idea, or some other ideological totem that justifies their actions.

They want obedience, of course. But even more, they want their rule, and their belief system, to be accepted and self-sustaining. And the only way to achieve that is to create a new society of people who share those beliefs, even if it means bludgeoning every last citizen into enlightenment. That’s what makes totalitarians different and more dangerous: they are “totalistic” in the sense that they demand a complete reorientation of the individual to the State and its ideological ends. Every person who harbors a secret objection, or even so much as a doubt, is a danger to the future of the whole project, and so the regime compels its subjects not only to obey but to believe.
The second part comes from an interview of Eric Hoffer by Eric Sevareid in 1967, which I've quoted before:
Eric Sevareid: You seem to have a fear about the rise of intellectuals in political life and power. Why are you so frightened of them?

Eric Hoffer: First of all, I ought to tell you that I have no grievance against intellectuals. All that I know about them is what I read in history books and what I've observed in our time. I'm convinced that the intellectuals as a type, as a group, are more corrupted by power than any other human type. It's disconcerting to realize that businessmen, generals, soldiers, men of action are less corrupted by power than intellectuals.

In my new book I elaborate on this and I offer an explanation why. You take a conventional man of action, and he's satisfied if you obey, eh? But not the intellectual. He doesn't want you just to obey. He wants you to get down on your knees and praise the one who makes you love what you hate and hate what you love. In other words, whenever the intellectuals are in power, there's soul-raping going on.
The entire interview is available on YouTube.  Totalitarians haven't changed, but you can see how far we've declined in forty-eight years.

UPDATE:  Gotta add one more, from an earlier post, an excerpt from Terry Pratchett's Discworld novel, Night Watch:
There were plotters, there was no doubt about it. Some had been ordinary people who'd had enough. Some were young people with no money who objected to the fact that the world was run by old people who were rich. Some were in it to get girls. And some had been idiots as mad as Swing, with a view of the world just as rigid and unreal, who were on the side of what they called "The People." Vimes had spent his life on the streets and had met decent men, and fools, and people who'd steal a penny from a blind beggar, and people who performed silent miracles or desperate crimes every day behind the grubby windows of little houses, but he'd never met The People.

People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so, the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn't that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.

As soon as you saw people as things to be measured, they didn't measure up.
They never do. And if soul-raping doesn't work, The People have to go.

Moment of Zen - By Request

Got this one in an email from a reader:

malibu_Milkyway photo MalibuMilkyWay_Fusco_1080.jpg

Yeah, I like that one. Click for the full size version.

Monday, July 06, 2015

Can We Get This Guy Some Help?

Richard from Special Interest Arms came to last year's Rendezvous and brought an assortment of very interesting suppressed firearms for us to shoot.  This year he says:
If I can get some help I might drag out the Gardner Gun and ammo.
45-70 twin barreled brass hand-crank fired fun. Not light, original crew was three guys.

Gardner Gun photo 100_6215.jpg
C'mon, all we need is some strong backs and willing hands!

Honored American Veterans Afield

HAVA is the organization that the Tenth Annual Gun Blogger Rendezvous is fundraising for.  Last year we raised more than $4,000.  Here's a little about them:


There's still time to register and join us!

Sunday, July 05, 2015

Gun Blogger Rendezvous Update

OK, so it's now July and the Rendezvous is coming up fast - August 20-23.  So who's going?

I am.  Clayton Cramer says he is.  I'm certain Mr. Completely and Keewee are coming.  My shootin' buddy DC is.  Bill Quick says he'll be there.  Not Clauzwitz, too.  A certain lawyer has been invited, but I don't know if he'll be coming again or not.

So who else?

Bueller?  Bueller?

Update:

Ms.VastRightWingConspiracy and Captialist Pig will be returning, along with the now-retired Packing Rat.